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    Traudl Junge

    Traudl Junge (16 March 192010 February 2002), born Gertraud Humps, was Adolf Hitler's youngest personal private secretary, from December 1942 to April 1945.


    An interview with Hitler's private secretary, Traudl Junge, who worked in the bunker until the very end. Part 1

    Gertraud "Traudl" Humps was born in Munich (Bavaria), the daughter of a master brewer and lieutenant in the Reserve Army, Max Humps and his wife Hildegard (née Zottmann). She had a sister, Inge, born in 1923. As a teenager she thought of becoming a ballerina.

    In November 1942, Junge was hired as a private secretary to Adolf Hitler


    Part 2

    "I was 22 and I didn't know anything about politics, it didn't interest me," Junge said decades later, also saying that she felt great guilt for "...liking the greatest criminal ever to have lived."

    She said, "I admit, I was fascinated by Adolf Hitler. He was a pleasant boss and a fatherly friend. I deliberately ignored all the warning voices inside me and enjoyed the time by his side almost until the bitter end. It wasn't what he said, but the way he said things and how he did things."

    At Hitler's encouragement, in June 1943 Junge married SS-officer Hans Hermann Junge (1914 – 1944), who died in combat. She worked at Hitler's side in Berlin, the Berghof in Berchtesgaden, at Wolfsschanze in East Prussia, and lastly back in Berlin.

    Junge claimed Hitler and his inner circle almost never mentioned Jews, a statement which some historians reject[citation needed], attributing it to a kind of "self-induced amnesia".[citation needed] She said Hitler did not like cut flowers because he did not want to be (in his words) "surrounded by corpses," and said he spent much of the time during his final days staring blankly and saying little.


    Part 3

    In 1945, Junge was with Hitler in Berlin. She typed Hitler's last private and political will and testament in the Führerbunker a day and a half before his suicide. Junge wrote that while playing with the Goebbels children on 30 April, "Suddenly . . . there is the sound of a shot, so loud, so close, that we all fall silent. It echoes on through all the rooms. 'That was a direct hit,' cried Helmut [Goebbels] with no idea how right he is. The Führer is dead now."

    On 1 May, Junge left the Führerbunker with a group led by SS-Brigadeführer Wilhelm Mohnke. Also included in the group were Hitler's personal pilot, Hans Baur, the chief of his bodyguard, Hans Rattenhuber, secretary Gerda Christian, secretary Else Krüger, Hitler's dietician, Constanze Manziarly, and Dr. Ernst-Günther Schenck. On the morning of 2 May, Soviet troops discovered remnants of the group hiding in a cellar off the Schönhauser Allee.[1


    Excerpt from the 2002 documentary "Blind Spot: Hitler´s Secretary", an interview with Traudl Junge who was Hitler´s private secretary from 1942 to 1945.

    Part 1 in German with English subtitles 

    Here in the Film "Der Untergang",we see her contemplating her escape from Berlin...

    ////////////////////////////

    Junge was raped repeatedly by Russian soldiers, as were many other German women during the fall of Berlin in 1945. She was subsequently held for a year as the "personal prisoner" of a Russian major.[2][3] At least one author asserts that Junge suffered a fractured skull while resisting a gang rape[4] but she does not mention such a rape or injury in her autobiography. After spending time in a Russian prison camp, Junge returned to Germany to work as a secretary and later as a sub-editor.

    Following the war, Junge was not widely known outside the academic and intelligence communities. Other than appearing in the 1974 television documentary The World at War, she lived a life of relative obscurity. This included two brief periods of residence in Australia, where Junge's younger sister still lives.[5]

    She returned to the public eye with the release of an autobiography, Until the Final Hour (2002, co-written with author Melissa Müller), which described the time she worked for Hitler. She was also interviewed for the 2002 documentary film Blind Spot: Hitler's Secretary. This suddenly brought her much attention and for a few days she was accorded something approaching global celebrity when, aged 81, she died in a Munich hospital.

    Traudl Junge died of cancer in Munich on February 10, 2002.[6] Shortly before her death she is reported to have said, "Now that I've let go of my story, I can let go of my life."




    Part 2

    I admit, I was fascinated by Adolf Hitler. He was a pleasant boss and a fatherly friend. I deliberately ignored all the warning voices inside me and enjoyed the time by his side almost until the bitter end. It wasn't what he said, but the way he said things and how he did things.


    Part 3

    Paragraph.


    Hitler's Jewish Soldiers

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