Menu:

Meindert Hobbema

Meindert Hobbema (bapt. Oct 31, 1638, Amsterdam - Dec 7, 1709, Amsterdam), was perhaps the greatest landscape painter of the Dutch school after Ruisdael...


The facts of his life are somewhat obscure. His chronology and signed pictures substantially contradict each other. According to the latter his practice lasted from 1650 to 1689; according to the former his birth occurred in 1638, his death as late as 1709. If the masterpiece formerly, in the Bredel collection, called A Wooded Stream, honestly bears the date of 1650, or The Cottages under Trees of the Ford collection the date of 1652, the painter of these canvases cannot be Hobbema, whose birth took place in 1638, unless indeed we admit that Hobbema painted some of his finest works at the age of twelve or fourteen. For a considerable period it was profitable to pass Hobbema's as Ruisdael's, and the name of the lesser master was probably erased from several of his productions. When Hobbema's talent was recognized, the contrary process was followed, and in this way the name, and perhaps fictitious dates, reappeared by fraud. An experienced eye will note the differences which occur in Hobbema's signatures in such well-known examples as adorn the galleries of London and Rotterdam, or the Grosvenor and van der Hoop collections. Meanwhile, we must be content to know that, if the question of dates could be brought into accordance with records and chronology, the facts of Hobbema's life would be as follows.

Meindert Hobbema was married at the age of thirty to Eeltije Vinck of Gorcum, in the Oude Kerk (Old Church) at Amsterdam, on 2 November 1668. Witnesses to the marriage were the bride's brother Cornelius Vinck and Jacob Ruisdael. We might suppose from this that Hobbema and Ruisdael, the two great masters of landscape, were united at this time by ties of friendship, and accept the belief that the former was the pupil of the latter. Yet even this is denied to us, since records tell us that there were two Jacob Ruysdaels, cousins and contemporaries, at Amsterdam in the middle of the 17th century - one a framemaker, the son of Solomon, the other a painter, the son of Isaac Ruysdael. Of Hobbema's marriage there came between 1668 and 1673 four children. In 1704 Eeltije died, and was buried in the pauper section of the Leiden cemetery at Amsterdam. Hobbema himself survived till December 1709, receiving burial on the 14th of that month in the pauper section of the Westerkerk cemetery at Amsterdam.

Husband and wife had lived during their lifetime in the Rozengracht, at no great distance from Rembrandt, who also dwelt there in his later and impoverished days. Rembrandt, Hals, Jacob Ruysdael, and Hobbema were in one respect alike. They all died in misery, insufficiently rewarded perhaps for their toil, imprudent perhaps in the use of the means derived from their labours.

Posterity has recognised that Hobbema and Ruisdael together represent the final development of landscape art in Holland. Their style is so related that we cannot suppose the first to have been unconnected with the second. Still their works differ in certain ways, and their character is generally so marked that we shall find little difficulty in distinguishing them, nor indeed shall we hesitate in separating those of Hobbema from the feebler productions of his imitators and predecessors Isaac Ruysdael, Rontbouts, de Vries, Dekker, Looten, Verboom, do Bois, van Kessel, van der Hagen, even Philip de Koningk.


In the exercise of his craft Hobbema was patient beyond all conception. It is doubtful whether any one ever so completely mastered as he did the still life of woods and hedges, or mills and pools. Nor can we believe that he obtained this mastery otherwise than by constantly dwelling in the same neighbourhood, say in Guelders or on the Dutch Westphalian border, where day after day he might study the branching and foliage of trees and underwood embowering cottages and mills, under every variety of light, in every shade of transparency, in all changes produced by the seasons. Though his landscapes are severely and moderately toned, generally in an olive key, and often attuned to a puritanical grey or russet, they surprise us, not only by the variety of their leafage, but by the finish of their detail as well as the boldness of their touch. With astonishing subtlety light is shown penetrating cloud, and illuminating, sometimes transiently, sometimes steadily, different portions of the ground, shining through leaves upon other leaves, and multiplying in an endless way the transparency of the picture. If the chance be given him he mirrors all these things in the still pool near a cottage, the reaches of a sluggish river, or the swirl of the stream that feeds a busy mill. The same spot will furnish him with several pictures. One mill gives him repeated opportunities of charming our eye; and this wonderful artist, who is only second to Ruisdael because he had not Ruisdael's versatility and did not extend his study equally to downs and rocky eminences, or torrents and estuaries - this is the man who lived penuriously, died poor, and left no trace in the artistic annals of his country. It has been said that Hobbema did not paint his own figures, but transferred that duty to Adriaen van de Velde, Lingelbach, Barendt Gael, and Abraham Storck. As to this much is conjecture


The Audio track above is Präludium by Esias Reusner.It is from a suite in A minor,composed in the mid 17th century.While Reusner was German,all of his compositions are for solo French Baroque lute...an instrument stung entirely in unwound gut strings.This performance was made  Michael Schäffer on an 11 course French lute by Michael Lowe in 1977 shortly before his death.

The audio track directly above is a Sarabande from the Suite in d minor for Solo Viol by Demachy in 1685.Not much survives of Demachy,as we don't even possess the knowledge of his 1st name.But nonetheless he left us this marvelously mysterious and plaintive set of pieces for the solo Viol.It is performed here by Jordi Savall on an anonymous Bass Viole made around the time that Demachy was fathering these poems to eternity.

Deux vrais amis vivaient au Monomotapa;
L'un ne possédait rien qui n'appartînt à l'autre.
            Les amis de ce pays-là
            Valent bien, dit-on, ceux du nôtre.

Une nuit que chacun s'occupait au sommeil,
Et mettait à profit l'absence de soleil,
Un de nos deux amis sort du lit en alarme ;
Il court chez son intime, éveille les valets :
Morphée avait touché le seuil de ce palais.
L'ami couché s'étonne; il prend sa bourse, il s'arme,
Vient trouver l'autre et dit : «Il vous arrive peu
De courir quand on dort ; vous me paraissez homme
A mieux user du temps destiné pour le somme :
N'auriez-vous point perdu tout votre argent au jeu ?
En voici. S'il vous est venu quelque querelle,
J'ai mon épée ; allons. Vous ennuyez-vous point
De coucher toujours seul? Une esclave assez belle
Était à mes côtés ; voulez-vous qu'on l'appelle ?
- Non, dit l'ami, ce n'est ni l'un ni l'autre point:
            Je vous rends grâce de ce zèle.
Vous m'êtes, en dormant, un peu triste apparu ;
J'ai craint qu'il ne fut vrai; je suis vite accouru.
            Ce maudit songe en est la cause.»

Qui d'eux aimait le mieux ? Que t'en semble, lecteur ?
Cette difficulté vaut bien qu'on la propose.
Qu'un ami véritable est une douce chose!
Il cherche vos besoins au fond de votre coeur;
            Il vous épargne la pudeur
            De les lui découvrir lui même :
            Un songe, un rien, tout lui fait peur
            Quand il s'agit de ce qu'il aime.

Jean de La Fontaine

The audio above is Rondeau l'afflige by Michel De La Barre from suite #2 in G major for the Flute Traverso with Basso continuo.The flute is performed Stphen Preston on a flute by Andreas Glatt working in Hotteterre's style.He is accompanied Jordi Savall on a 7 string Gamba by an anonymous 17th century French maker,Blandine Verlet on a Clavecin by Pierre Bellot made in 1729,and finally Hopkinson Smith on a Theorbo by Mathias Durvie in the style of a surviving lute by Mateo Sellas made in Venezia in 1637.

Deux mulets cheminaient, l'un d'avoine chargé,
L'autre portant l'argent de la gabelle
Celui-ci, glorieux d'une charge si belle,
N'eût voulu pour beaucoup en être soulagé.
Il marchait d'un pas relevé,
Et faisait sonner sa sonnette:
Quand, l'ennemi se présentant,
Comme il en voulait à l'argent,
Sur le mulet du fisc une troupe se jette,
Le saisit au frein et l'arrête.
Le mulet, en se défendant,
Se sent percé de coups; il gémit, il soupire.
Est-ce donc là, dit-il, ce qu'on m'avait promis?
Ce mulet qui me suit du danger se retire;
Et moi j'y tombe et je péris!
- Ami, lui dit son camarade,
Il n'est pas toujours bon d'avoir un haut emploi:
Si tu n'avais servi qu'un meunier, comme moi,
Tu ne serais pas si malade.

Jean de La Fontaine

The Audio above has the remarkable title of..."Allemande grave Andromede(Tombeau de Monsieur Blancrocher ou Les Larmes de Gaultier)..." It is from the  2nd suite in A major from "La Rhetorique des Dieux" by the famous Parisienne lutenist Denis Gaultier 1600-1672.It is played here by Hopkinson Smith on an original surviving 11 course lute made in Bologna in 1644 by Pietro Railich.It features a bowl made from Rosewood and the top has been scraped and tuned by the maker into many different pitches so that it can offer this exquisitely shaded tone rich in the nostalgia and psychological depth that undergird Meindert's entrancing landscapes.



Une chèvre, un mouton, avec un cochon gras,
Montés sur un même char, s'en allaient à la foire.
Leur divertissement ne les y portait pas ;
On s'en allait les vendre, à ce que dit l'histoire :
Le charton n'avait pas dessein
De les mener voir Tabarin.
Dom pourceau criait en chemin
Comme s'il avait eu cent bouchers à ses trousses.
C'était une clameur à rendre les gens sourds.
Les autres animaux, créatures plus douces,
Bonnes gens, s'étonnaient qu'il criât au secours;
Ils ne voyaient nul mal à craindre.
Le charton dit au porc :« Qu'as-tu tant à te plaindre ?
Tu nous étourdis tous : que ne te tiens-tu coi?
Ces deux personnes-ci, plus honnêtes que toi,
Devraient t'apprendre à vivre ou du moins à te taire :
Regarde ce mouton, a-t-il dit un seul mot?
Il est sage. - Il est sot,
Repartit le cochon : s'il savait son affaire,
Il crierait, comme moi, du haut de son gosier;
Et cette autre personne honnête
Crierait tout du haut de sa tête.
Ils pensent qu'on les veut seulement décharger,
La chèvre de son lait, le mouton de sa laine:
Je ne sais pas s'ils ont raison ;
Mais quant à moi qui ne suis bon
Qu'à manger, ma mort est certaine.
Adieu mon toit et ma maison.»

Dom pourceau raisonnait en subtil personnage.
Mais que lui servait-il ? Quand le mal est certain,
La plainte ni la peur ne changent le destin
Et le moins prévoyant est toujours le plus sage.

Jean de La Fontaine

The audio above is "Les Jumeles" from Francois Couperin's 12th Ordre.It is performed by the late Raymond Touyere on an unknown Clavecin.Raymond lends this piece a noble intimacy full of nostalgic sweetness in a way almost no Clavecinistes of the 20th century performed.Certainly it is far away from the normal establishment ideas of what this expression is and could be.Which makes this performance even more a treasure.

Deux vrais amis vivaient au Monomotapa;
L'un ne possédait rien qui n'appartînt à l'autre.
            Les amis de ce pays-là
            Valent bien, dit-on, ceux du nôtre.

Une nuit que chacun s'occupait au sommeil,
Et mettait à profit l'absence de soleil,
Un de nos deux amis sort du lit en alarme ;
Il court chez son intime, éveille les valets :
Morphée avait touché le seuil de ce palais.
L'ami couché s'étonne; il prend sa bourse, il s'arme,
Vient trouver l'autre et dit : «Il vous arrive peu
De courir quand on dort ; vous me paraissez homme
A mieux user du temps destiné pour le somme :
N'auriez-vous point perdu tout votre argent au jeu ?
En voici. S'il vous est venu quelque querelle,
J'ai mon épée ; allons. Vous ennuyez-vous point
De coucher toujours seul? Une esclave assez belle
Était à mes côtés ; voulez-vous qu'on l'appelle ?
- Non, dit l'ami, ce n'est ni l'un ni l'autre point:
            Je vous rends grâce de ce zèle.
Vous m'êtes, en dormant, un peu triste apparu ;
J'ai craint qu'il ne fut vrai; je suis vite accouru.
            Ce maudit songe en est la cause.»

Qui d'eux aimait le mieux ? Que t'en semble, lecteur ?
Cette difficulté vaut bien qu'on la propose.
Qu'un ami véritable est une douce chose!
Il cherche vos besoins au fond de votre coeur;
            Il vous épargne la pudeur
            De les lui découvrir lui même :
            Un songe, un rien, tout lui fait peur
            Quand il s'agit de ce qu'il aime.

Maître corbeau, sur un arbre perché,
        Tenait en son bec un fromage.
Maître renard par l'odeur alléché ,
        Lui tint à peu près ce langage :
        «Et bonjour Monsieur du Corbeau.
Que vous êtes joli! que vous me semblez beau!
        Sans mentir, si votre ramage
        Se rapporte à votre plumage,
Vous êtes le phénix des hôtes de ces bois»
A ces mots le corbeau ne se sent pas de joie;
        Et pour montrer sa belle voix,
Il ouvre un large bec laisse tomber sa proie.
Le renard s'en saisit et dit: "Mon bon Monsieur,
            Apprenez que tout flatteur
Vit aux dépens de celui qui l'écoute:
Cette leçon vaut bien un fromage sans doute."
        Le corbeau honteux et confus
Jura mais un peu tard , qu'on ne l'y prendrait plus

Jean de La Fontaine

The Track above is a pair of Muzettes,(that sound like 2 impassioned vixens plaintively wandering the countryside in search of contentment)by Marin Marais.It is performed by Jordi Savall on the Bass Viol and accompanied by Rolf Lislevand on the theorbo.

J'ai lu, chez un conteur de fables, 
Qu'un second Rodilard, l'Alexandre des chats,
            L'Attila, le fléau des rats, 
            Rendait ces derniers misérables
            J'ai lu, dis-je, en certain auteur 
            Que ce chat exterminateur, 
Vrai Cerbère, était craint une lieue à la ronde:
Il voulait de souris dépeupler tout le monde. 
Les planches qu'on suspend sur un léger appui, 
            La mort aux rats, les souricières,
            N'étaient que jeux au prix de lui.
            Comme il voit que dans leurs tanières 
            Les souris étaient prisonnières, 
Qu'elles n'osaient sortir, qu'il avait beau chercher,
Le galant fait le mort, et du haut d'un plancher
Se pend la tête en bas. La bête scélérate 
A de certains cordons se tenait par la patte. 
Le peuple des souris croit que c'est châtiment, 
Qu'il a fait un larcin de rôt ou de fromage,
Egratigné quelqu'un, causé quelque dommage; 
Enfin, qu'on a pendu le mauvais garnement. 
            Toutes, dis-je, unanimement
Se promettent de rire à son enterrement, 
Mettent le nez à l'air, montrent un peu la tête, 
            Puis rentrent dans leurs nids à rats,
            Puis ressortant font quatre pas, 
            Puis enfin se mettent en quête. 
            Mais voici bien une autre fête: 
Le pendu ressuscite; et sur ses pieds tombant, 
            Attrape les plus paresseuses.
«Nous en savons plus d'un, dit-il en les gobant:
C'est tour de vieille guerre; et vos cavernes creuses 
Ne vous sauveront pas, je vous en avertis: 
            Vous viendrez toutes au logis.» 
            Il prophétisait vrai: notre maître Mitis
Pour la seconde fois les trompe et les affine,
            Blanchit sa robe et s'enfarine; 
            Et de la sorte déguisé, 
Se niche et se blottit dans une huche ouverte. 
            Ce fut à lui bien avisé: 
La gent trotte-menu s'en vient chercher sa perte.
Un rat, sans plus, s'abstient d'aller flairer autour: 
C'était un vieux routier, il savait plus d'un tour; 
Même il avait perdu sa queue à la bataille. 
«Ce bloc enfariné ne me dit rien qui vaille, 
S'écria-t-il de loin au général des chats:
Je soupçonne dessous encor quelque machine:
            Rien ne te sert d'être farine; 
Car, quand tu serais sac, je n'approcherais pas.» C'était bien dit à lui; j'approuve sa prudence: 
            Il était expérimenté, 
            Et savait que la méfiance 
            Est mère de la sûreté.

Jean de La Fontaine